Animal Health

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Diagnosed in Clallam County 

  |   Animal Health

Rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) continues to spread in northwest Washington. Three dead rabbits kept at a property in Clallam County tested positive for the disease in late December. The Washington State Veterinarian expects the areas affected by the disease to continue to expand because it can be spread easily by a wide variety of means including small rodents, birds and larger carnivores. WSDA has quarantined the property where the disease was identified in owned domestic rabbits. Rabbit owners are urged...

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Equine Influenza Season is Here

  |   Animal Health

Washington, horse owners may want to learn more about the disease and how to protect their animals. Making sure vaccinations are up-to-date is an important place start. Equine influenza a highly contagious viral disease of horses, is the most important equine respiratory disease in many countries. Characterized by high morbidity and occasional mortality, some circulating strains can be fatal, especially in donkeys and mules. Infected horses cough or snort infective droplets into the air which are inhaled by horses in close...

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Alerts from the State Veterinarian’s Office

  |   Animal Health

Equine Influenza confirmed in Spokane County A seven-year-old Thoroughbred gelding and a five-year-old Warmblood mare tested positive for equine influenza (H3N8) at a premises in Spokane County, Washington, on November 15. Several other horses that attended a local show were also showing clinical signs including coughing, fever and nasal discharge. Neither of the horses were up to date on vaccines. The reporting veterinarian is overseeing a voluntary quarantine of the farm. Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease confirmed in Grant County A two-year-old crossbred heifer...

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Deadly deer virus detected in Western Washington yak

  |   Animal Health

  Last week, a Whatcom County veterinarian euthanized a six-year-old yak cow showing symptoms of Epizootic Hemorrhagic disease (EHD), a potentially deadly virus that primarily effects wild deer populations, but occasionally crosses over to cattle. A subsequent Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL) necropsy confirmed the animal had EHD. Two other yaks from the herd died in recent weeks after displaying similar clinical signs such as stiff gate, drooling and nasal secretions that are consistent with EHD. According to the owner's report, the euthanized...

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Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Franklin and Walla Walla Counties

  |   Animal Health

Four cows in Franklin and Walla Walla counties were diagnosed last week with Epizootic Hemorrhagic disease (EHD), a potentially deadly virus that primarily effects wild deer populations but occasionally crosses over to cattle.  Veterinarians should be on the lookout for EHD symptoms such as excessive drooling, lethargy, difficulty walking, or oral and nasal lesions with ulceration, which are similar to the much more devastating foot-and-mouth disease. Fever and anorexia due to the oral erosions were seen in the recently diagnosed cattle....

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WSDA issues advisory about vesicular stomatitis

  |   Animal Health

The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) announced that all susceptible species (cattle, equine, swine, sheep and goats) entering Washington State from a state where vesicular stomatitis (VS) has been diagnosed within the past 30 days must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) with a valid entry permit number. The CVI for susceptible species must be issued within 24 hours of shipment to Washington State. Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is a highly infectious, reportable disease of equine and cloven-hooved...

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New Canine Influenza Cases in OR and WA

  |   Animal Health

On July 24, Golden Bond Rescue of Oregon transported eight Golden Retrievers from China via Taipei, Taiwan to Seattle, WA. Upon their arrival, the dogs stayed the night in Tacoma, WA where one of the dogs became ill. The ill dog exhibits respiratory disease and malaise and was seen at a local veterinary center where the dog was tested for respiratory pathogens; final results indicated Bordetella and mycoplasma positive and H3N8 negative. There was no mention of testing for H3N2...

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Deadly Rabbit Disease Confirmed on Orcas Island

  |   Animal Health

The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has confirmed a case of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) in a domestic rabbit on Orcas Island. RHD is a viral disease that causes sudden death in rabbits and can be spread through contact with infected rabbits, their meat or their fur, or materials coming in contact with them. On July 9, the Washington State Veterinarian's Office received a report of a dead domestic pet rabbit from a veterinarian clinic on Orcas Island....

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WA Dept. of Health Zoonotic Disease Survey

  |   Animal Health

The Washington State Department of Health Zoonotic Disease Program is developing a strategic plan to guide their future program activities and the services they provide. As part of that process, they are seeking the following: to understand which of the current services they deliver provide the most value to you and to public health a rating of their performance in these areas to gather your thoughts on future plans for the program. Your responses to the survey will provide valuable information...

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Get calls about bats? Use this handy guide

  |   Animal Health

The Washington State Department of Health is pleased to introduce their Guide for Veterinary Offices for Handling Calls about Bat Encounters. The new guide strengthens the connections between veterinary hospitals and their local health department and guides veterinary staff when responding to public calls concerning bat encounters. It stresses the importance of public contacting their local health department immediately to triage possible human and pet rabies exposure. In addition, the Department refreshed the look of their fact sheet, Safely Capturing Bats...

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