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Food allergies in pets are rarely a thing

  |   Animal Health

Banfield Pet Hospital® released its 2018 State of Pet Health® Report, which explores the science behind the three most common atopic dermatitis conditions in pets: flea, atopy and food.

With food allergies in humans being reported at an all-time high, veterinarians are seeing pet owners become increasingly concerned about food allergies in their pets. However, according to the report, food allergies are diagnosed in relatively few of our patients, just 0.2 percent of dogs and 0.1 percent of cats. More commonly, pets are diagnosed with flea allergy or atopy. Flea allergy has been on the rise over the past 10 years, including a 12 percent increase in dogs and a 67 percent increase in cats.

Key findings from Banfield’s 2018 State of Pet Health Report include:

  • Flea Allergies. Flea allergy has been on the rise over the past 10 years, including a 12 percent increase in dogs and a 67 percent increase in cats. According to Banfield data, cats are twice as likely as dogs to be found with fleas.
  • Atopy. Atopic dermatitis is also on an upward trend, with a more than 30 percent increase in dogs and 11 percent increase in cats over the last decade.
  • Food Allergies. Food allergic pets are also more prone to skin infections – dogs are six times more likely to develop a bacterial skin infection, whereas cats are 15 times more likely.

We have an opportunity to close the knowledge gap for pet owners around skin allergies. Read more in Banfield’s State of Pet Health Report. You can also find a downloadable infographic for the veterinary team to support client conversations, which can be found on the Banfield Exchange.

Posted 6/8/18