Animal Health Alerts

August 29, 2016

Washington State Diagnostic Lab Confirms 10 Equine WNV Cases

By Edited Press Release

TheHorse.com

The Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL) has confirmed 10 cases of West Nile fever in horses since Aug. 9.

The laboratory in Washington State University’s (WSU) College of Veterinary Medicine has tested 38 horses since Jan. 1. All 10 cases confirmed positive recently were in unvaccinated horses in Spokane, Lincoln, and Pend Oreille counties in Washington and Boundary County in northern Idaho. All 10 had neurologic disease that occurs with West Nile encephalitis characterized by inflammation of the central nervous system.

The cases are unrelated to the equine herpesvirus-1 case confirmed by WADDL in a hospitalized horse at WSU’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The EHV-1 horse has since been humanely euthanized.

Full text:

http://www.thehorse.com/articles/38080/washington-state-diagnostic-lab-confirms-10-equine-wnv-cases


August 19, 2016

CONTACT:  Charlie Powell (509) 335-7073 (all hrs.) or [email protected]

WSU VETERINARIANS CONFIRM EQUINE HERPES CASE, TEACHING HOSPITAL REMAINS OPEN

PULLMAN, Wash.—The Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine has confirmed a single horse with a rare neurologic form of Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1).

Confirmation came late today and the horse has been in isolation in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Pullman, Wash., since its arrival yesterday at this time. The horse will be humanely euthanized today and its stall and surroundings will undergo terminal cleaning.

The horse in question is an 18 year-old quarterhorse mare from Newport, Wash., that has until it developed symptoms, been competing in rodeo events in the inland Pacific Northwest.

As required by law, WSU veterinarians have contacted the Washington Assistant State Veterinarian, Scott Haskell. His office and the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) will respond to the situation statewide.

The EHV-1 type was confirmed based upon clinical neurologic signs shown by the horse as well as testing by the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL) in Pullman.

The virus is highly contagious and is spread via aerosolized secretions from infected coughing horses, by direct and indirect (fomite) contact with nasal secretions, and, in the case of EHV-1, contact with aborted fetuses, fetal fluids, and placentae associated with abortions.  Disease can range from subclinical to the severe neurologic symptoms seen in the horse at WSU.

Horse owners are advised to contact their veterinarian to discuss vaccination and means for preventing EHV infections.  The last outbreak affecting Washington horses came in May of 2011.

At this time and since the horse has been in constant isolation since arrival, the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital remains open to receiving equine patients as needed.  Owners may want to call ahead to ensure the hospital is still open as this situation develops.  The number is 509-335-0711.

WSDA and WSU will issue any additional status reports as information becomes available.

Tips for horse owners – protecting your animal from Equine Herpesvirus – USDA


Notes from the Field: Fatal Infection Associated with Equine Exposure — King County, Washington, 2016

On March 17, 2016, Public Health—Seattle & King County in Washington was notified of two persons who received a diagnosis of Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) infections. S. zooepidemicus is a zoonotic pathogen that rarely causes human illness and is usually associated with consuming unpasteurized dairy products or with direct horse contact (1). In horses, S. zooepidemicus is a commensal bacterium that can cause respiratory, wound, and uterine infections (2). The health department investigated to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, identify risk factors, and offer recommendations.

Patient A, a previously healthy woman aged 37 years, operated a horse boarding and riding facility in King County, Washington. Patient A fed, groomed, and exercised the facility’s six horses and cleaned the stalls daily. During the week of February 21, 2016, patient A developed mild pharyngitis and cough. During the week of February 21, horse A developed mucopurulent ocular and nasal discharge and lethargy. On February 29, patient A began administering 10 days of sulfa-based antibiotics to horse A, which recovered without incident.

Patient B, a previously healthy woman aged 71 years and the mother of patient A, developed symptoms consistent with an upper respiratory infection during the week of February 21 while visiting patient A and living in the same household. On March 2, she developed vomiting and diarrhea. On March 3, she was found unconscious and transported to a hospital, where she died that day. Patient B had close contact (i.e., riding, petting, and walking) with horse A on at least February 25 and February 29.

Culture results of nasal swabs collected on March 10 from horse A and two other horses that appeared well were positive for S. zooepidemicus. Patient A did not report consumption of unpasteurized dairy products or exposure to other animals, apart from one healthy cat, during the preceding 2 months. A throat culture from patient A obtained March 10 and blood cultures from patient B grew S. zooepidemicus isolates indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from isolates cultured from horse A and a second horse at the facility. S. zooepidemicus cultured from a third horse did not match other isolates.

The epidemiologic and laboratory evidence from this investigation linked a fatal S. zooepidemicus infection to close contact with an ill horse. Patient B might have been at increased risk for invasive disease by S. zooepidemicus because of her age and her possible antecedent upper respiratory infection. Because patient A specifically sought health care and a throat culture as a result of patient B’s death, determining whether the S. zooepidemicus infection preceded or followed her mild illness approximately 2 weeks earlier was not possible.

Although S. zooepidemicus is a rare zoonotic pathogen in humans, older persons might be at increased risk for a fatal outcome from this infection; in 32 reported cases, the median age was 61 years (range = <1 to 83 years) with 7 deaths (case-fatality rate = 22%) (1). Consistently practicing thorough hand washing with soap and water after contact with horses and other animals or areas where animals are housed is recommended (3). This outbreak highlights the need for more research regarding risk factors for zoonotic transmission and spectrum of human illness associated with S. zooepidemicus.

International Society for Infectious Disease

PRO-AH- Equine piroplasmosis – USA: (NM) – March 21, 2016

PRO-AH-EDR Onchocerca lupi – USA: (Southwest) canine, human – February 25, 2016

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (09): USA (NM) – February 15, 2016

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (06): USA (IL,NM) – February 3, 2016

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (03): USA (NM) – January 22, 2016

PRO-AH-EDR Antibiotic resistance – Netherlands: colistin, MCR-1, salmonella, poultry meat – December 18, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (26): (CO) livestock – December 10, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Avian influenza (201): Canada (BC) HPAI H5N2, duck – November 26, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Enzootic bovine leukosis – Canada – November 26, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Brucellosis, bovine – USA: (WY) – November 22, 2015

PRO-AH Xylitol poisoning, canine – USA: (NC) – November 5, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (25): (UT) livestock – October 30, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (24) (WY): livestock – October 28, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (23): (UT) equine – October 23, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine influenza – USA (02): (OR) – October 21, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Campylobacteriosis, E. coli EHEC – USA: (ID) unpasteurized milk, recall – October 22, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (21): (WY) livestock – October 17, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR- Rabies – USA (41): (OR) bat, human exposure – October 9, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR- Vesicular stomatitis – USA (19): (WY) livestock – October 6, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR –  Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (21): USA (PA) – October 5, 2015

PRO-AH Bluetongue – USA (02): (WA) cervid – October 1, 2015

PRO-AH Vesicular stomatitis – USA (18): update – September 29, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (17): (WY,NE) bovine, equine – September 26, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (20): USA (MN) – September 21, 2015

VS update: Vesicular stomatitis confirmed in Nebraska, seven other states – September 18, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Bluetongue – USA: (WA) cervid, RFI – September 17, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine infectious anemia – USA (04): (KY) unlicensed vaccine – September 15, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR- Equine infectious anemia – USA (03): (KY) – September 14, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR- Vesicular stomatitis – USA (15): (NE) equine – September 13, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (10): (NJ, TX) equine – September 1, 2015

Colorado VS: 91 Premises in 11 Counties Quarantined – August 25, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Pseudorabies, feral swine – USA: (CA) – August 25, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine infectious anemia – Canada: (SK) – August 21, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (13): update – August 21, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine influenza vaccine – USA: new USEF rules – August 17, 2015

PRO-AH Vesicular stomatitis – USA (12): (CO) livestock – August 16, 2015

PRO-AH Canine distemper, wildlife – USA (03): (MT) raccoon, alert – August 13, 2015

PRO-AH Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (08): (MT) equine, NOT, corr – August 13, 2015

PRO-AH Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (08): (MT) equine – August 10, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, swine (03): USA, evolutionary dynamics IAV in swine, human threat – August 7, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, swine (02): USA (MN) novel strains, human infection – August 4, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (11): (SD) – August 1, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Salmonellosis – USA (11): (WA) pork, serotype I 4,[5],12:i:- – July 31, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (07): (TX) equine – July 31, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Tularemia – USA (11): (WY) rabbit – July 31, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR  Plague, animal – USA (12): (CO) feline – July 30, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Salmonellosis – USA (08): (WA) pork – July 26, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, swine – USA: (MN) novel strains, human case H3N2v – July 25, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Tularemia – USA (08): (ND): human, animal – July 25, 2015

Vesicular Stomatitis case found in Wyoming – July 25, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, canine – USA (13): (OH) H3N2 – July 24, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, canine – USA (12): (NC) H3N2 – July 23, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Tularemia – USA (08): (WY) – July 18, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (06): (SC) equine – July 17, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (10): (CO) equine additional cases – July 16, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (05): (FL) equine, caprine – July 15, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Leptospirosis, canine – USA: (CA) – July 14, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (19): Canada (ON) – July 13, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (04): (TX) equine – July 13, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA (03): (NC) equine – July 12, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Rabies – USA (22): (WA,KS) bat, wildlife, human exp – July 10, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Tularemia – USA (06): (CO) rabbit, alert – July 3, 2015

PRO-AH Tularemia, animal – USA (02): (NM) canine, alert – June 23, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine influenza – USA: (OR) – June 23, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Plague – USA (02): (CO) fatality – June 21, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, canine – USA (11): (MN) H3N2 – June 19, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Snake fungal disease – USA (02): spread – June 18, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Toxic algae – USA: (MN) pet deaths, alert – June 16, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Plague, animal – USA (07): (ID) canine – June 8, 2015

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (17): USA (OR) – June 8, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Campylobacteriosis – USA (02): (CA) raw goat milk – June 6, 2015

PRO-AH Influenza, canine – USA (09): (SD) H3N2 – June 4, 2015

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (16): USA (OR) – June 4, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Cat scratch disease – USA: (OH) visual loss – June 1, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA (08) (AZ, TX): Equine, response – May 29, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Plague, animal – USA: (ID) ground squirrel, alert – May 27, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America (14): USA (VA, CA) – May 24, 2015

PRO-AH Influenza, canine – USA (09): (MA) multistate, H3N2 – May 24, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Rabies – USA 12 NM – fox, human exp, new bat strain virus – May 21, 2015

PRO-AH Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America 13 USA PA+IA – May 20, 2015

PRO-AH Vesicular stomatitis – USA 06 TX equine – May 20, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Salmonellosis st Muenchen – USA crested gecko exposure – May 14, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Influenza, canine – USA 07 TX H3N2 alert – May 12, 2-15

PRO-AH-EDR Eastern equine encephalitis – USA-FL equine – May 7, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Vesicular stomatitis – USA 05 equine, response – May 7, 2015

PRO-AH Influenza canine – USA 06 IA H3N2 – April 30, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine herpesvirus, equine – North America 11 USA-OR – April 30, 2015

PRO-AH-EDR Equine infectious anemia – USA 02 – TN – April 30, 2015

Washington State Department of Health

Cat found with Rabies: For the first time since 2002, a pet cat in Washington has been found to have rabies. The 2-year old female cat from Chimacum tested positive on Tuesday, according to Jefferson County Public Health. The cat has been euthanized.

The owner was bitten sometime in the past week. Several people, including the cat’s owner and a veterinary technician are being given rabies shots as a precaution. The most likely scenario is that the cat contracted rabies from killing and/or eating a bat, as bats are the most common carriers of rabies in the state.

More information on this story can be found here and here.
Tick Surveillance 5th Year Summary


West Nile Virus: Washington State Department of Health received reports of two WNV PVDs in Grant and Yakima Counties. Donors were likely exposed in their county of residence. WSDA reports another positive horse from Franklin County and Grant County MCD’s testing detected 12 positive mosquito samples. See attached WNV test summary report for a county breakdown of environmental testing.

West Nile Virus Activity in Washington, as of September 9, 2015

Humans – 20 in-state aquired

Horses – 22

Birds – 6 (Note: Two Benton County birds had been collected January 15, therefore findings are not considered representative of this season’s viral activity.)

Mosquito Samples – 151

6 PVDs* identified.  Both donors reside in Benton County; likely exposure in Benton County.

*CDC’s definition of PVDs: Preumptive viremic blood donors are people who had no symptoms at the time of donating blood through a blood collection agency, but who blood tested positive when screened for presence of West Nile virus.  Some PVDs develop sumptoms after donation.

For additional information about WNV and its activity in the state, please visit our website at www.doh.wa.gov/wnv (updated daily 3PM).


West Nile Virus Activity in the United States

As of September 8, CDC (ArboNET) reports WNV activity in 45 states. This includes 493 human cases (272 classified as neuroinvasive disease and 221 non-neuroinvasive disease; 15 deaths and 133 PVDs). For more, see CDC West Nile virus statistics and maps.

West Nile Virus Makes a Comeback in Washington State – The Daily Astorian

Zoonotic Disease Data and Reports – Department of Health

West Nile Virus Activity by State – United States, 2015CDC

West Nile Virus activity in Washington – WSVMA All viral detections are located in south-central Washington. For additional information about West Nile virus and its activity in the state, please visit our website at www.doh.wa.gov/wnv

West Nile Virus Surveillance Maps and Statistics

West Nile virus infection confirmed in Washington resident – July 8, 2015


Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease in Washington

Washington State Department of Agriculture
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

Washington bat found with deadly disease

The fungal disease that has killed more than six million bats across 28 states and five Canadian provinces since 2006 has been found for the first time in the western United States. Federal wildlife officials verified white-nose syndrome, caused by the Pseudogymnoascus destructans fungus, in a little brown bat located in North Bend, 30 miles east of Seattle. Until now, the fungus had not been detected west of Nebraska. Hikers found the sick bat and brought it to a shelter where it died two days later.

Clinical signs of white-nose syndrome include presence of a white powder-appearing substance on their nose, wings or ears during hibernation when body temperature is reduced and the environment is near freezing; emaciation; damaged wings with potential loss of flight; and activity during winter, including flying outside during freezing temperatures. The disease disrupts hibernation, causing them to lose crucial winter fat stores. The average rate of mortality in a colony is close to 100%.

Seven hibernating species of bats in North America have been affected by the disease, and in Washington, another 11 species could be at risk. Humans are not known to be susceptible to infection with the fungus.

Given the level of the disease found in the bat, wildlife officials believe it isn’t an isolated case. The fungus spreads through physical bat-to-bat contact or infected environment-to-bat contact and can be spread by humans through clothing and gear used in caves, mines and roosts.  In the eastern U.S., white-nose syndrome led to the closure of caves to the public. In Washington, little brown bats live in trees, rock crevices and buildings. Wildlife officials are currently searching for other infected bats in the area.

High mortality of bats can have devastating effects on the ecosystem. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) reports that bats save U.S. farmers over $3 billion annually in pest control services.

If you see a sick or dying bat, or a bat with visible signs of white-nose syndrome, or if you witness unusual behavior such as trouble flying, flying during the daytime, or in freezing weather, use the WDFW online reporting form or call (800) 606-8768. Do not handle live bats and avoid entering caves, mines or other areas used by bats.

Companion Animal Parasite Council

Canine Influenza

Canine influenza transmitted to cats in Indiana shelter

The University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine has confirmed H3N2 canine influenza in four cats at a shelter in Indiana. The group of cats displayed unusual signs of respiratory disease prompting testing for a possible outbreak of canine influenza. Several dogs in the shelter also tested positive for the virus. Previous feline cases of the H3N2 virus were reported in South Korea but just one cat tested positive in the U.S. last year.

Symptoms in the affected cats included runny nose, congestion, lip-smacking, excessive salivation and general malaise. The symptoms resolved quickly and there were no fatalities. The genetic signature is identical to the H3N2 virus that infects dogs and it can replicate and spread from cat to cat.

There is an H3N2 vaccine for dogs but it isn’t currently approved or recommended for cats. For more information visit the UW School of Veterinary Medicine website and FAQs: Feline infections with canine influenza H3N2 (CIV).


Two dogs test positive for H3N2 canine influenza

Results received from the Cornell Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory confirmed canine influenza virus H3N2 in the two dogs who developed respiratory disease while boarding at a Kent, WA boarding kennel in late December/early January. These two dogs has previously tested positive for canine influenza virus on pcr testing at Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL) at WSU. Both acute and convalescent (10-14 days later) titers were evaluated at Cornell. The acute titers were negative, the convalescent titers positive for H3N2. According to the primary care veterinarian, the dogs did not have fevers but did have cough, treatment was minimal and they are now doing well.

Veterinarians interested in testing for canine influenza virus (CIV) in patients with respiratory disease should contact their reference laboratory for information on CIV testing by pcr and serology.  Dr. Beth Lipton, public health veterinarian for Seattle/King County is putting together a reporting form for area veterinarians which should be available shortly. At this time, the WSVMA is not aware of any other dogs testing positive for canine influenza.

Dogs should be up to date on their core vaccinations. Vaccination for canine influenza virus is still based on risk of exposure of the individual dog and concerns of both the veterinarian and dog owner.

Additional resources are available on the WSVMA website and from the AVMA. Zoetis offers an on-demand webinar on canine influenza featuring Dr. Stephan Carey from Michigan State University. Merck will be hosting a webinar on Wednesday, January 27, 2016. More information and links to register for the webinar will be forthcoming.


New update on canine influenza in King County – January 14, 2016

Results of canine influenza pcr testing on two dogs that were part of the respiratory illness outbreak are positive, confirming canine influenza virus (CIV). It is not yet known if this is CIV H3N8 or H3N2. CIV antibody test results for H3N8 and H3N2 on convalescent samples from the dogs should be available next week. King County Public Health officials are still concerned that this will be CIV H3N2 based on results from the dogs tested in Georgia.

Veterinarians interested in testing for CIV in patients with respiratory disease should contact their reference laboratory for information on CIV testing by pcr and serology. In King County, Dr. Beth Lipton, public health veterinarian, should be contacted in these initial days regarding confirmed cases. Although there is not currently an official reporting system for small animal diseases such as canine influenza in Washington State, veterinarians should feel free to contact the WSVMA and/or the State Veterinarian’s office.

Vaccination for respiratory disease is still based on risk of exposure of the individual dog and concerns of both the veterinarian and dog owner.

Dog owners be on the lookout– canine influenza a possibility in King County


Update on canine influenza in King County – January 13, 2016

The two dogs with respiratory disease that tested positive for canine influenza virus H3N2 were located in another state (Georgia) and had never traveled to Washington. They had both been exposed to a dog from Washington that experienced respiratory illness as part of the outbreak in the King County facility. These out of state dogs do not appear to have been exposed to any other dogs with a history of respiratory disease.

Testing for H3N2 is being done on two dogs that were part of the respiratory illness outbreak and those results should be available shortly.

Testing for H3N2 can be done by two methods. PCR testing for the influenza virus is best done within the first four days of onset of clinical signs. Antibody testing (serology) is best done in the later stages of the clinical disease by acute and convalescent samples (10-14 days apart). In areas of low prevalence of canine influenza virus, a single sample taken greater than seven days after acute onset of disease may be sufficient for diagnosis.  Veterinarians should contact their reference laboratory for more detailed information on testing.

Vaccination for H3N8 has been available for a few years and both Zoetis and Merck Animal Health have recently released an H3N2 vaccine conditionally approved by the FDA. Whether or not to vaccinate a dog with one or both vaccinations depends on assessment of risk factors in the individual patient. The AVMA recently updated (12/10/2015) their Pet Owner’s Guide for Canine Influenza available at the AVMA website. The guide contains links to other information sources including information on the new H3N2 vaccines and veterinary professionals may also find it helpful.  For more information on the vaccines, also consult your Zoetis or Merck Animal Health pharmaceutical representative.

Additional resources can be accessed on the WSVMA website. The WSVMA will continue to inform members as information comes available.


Potential canine influenza virus H3N2 in King County dogs

Public Health – Seattle & King County’s Zoonotic Disease program has received reports of dogs in King County who may be infected with canine influenza virus H3N2. Two dogs associated with a respiratory illness outbreak in a King County boarding and dog daycare facility had laboratory results indicating H3N2 positive infection through PCR testing. These two dogs did not actually spend time in the facility but had contact with one dog that did. Public Health’s Zoonotic Disease program is collecting more information and awaiting laboratory results of two other dogs that were part of the outbreak.

Consider H3N2 as a diagnosis: Please be aware of the potential of canine influenza virus H3N2 and consider it as a diagnosis in a dog presenting with respiratory signs of cough, runny nose and/or fever. Consider this diagnosis particularly if the dog has been boarded recently or has recently participated in dog-related group activities or has been exposed to other dogs known to have canine influenza or kennel cough.

Isolation of suspected cases: Dogs that present with respiratory signs should be brought directly into a separate examination/triage area that is reserved for dogs with respiratory signs. Do not allow them to enter the waiting room or other areas where susceptible dogs may be present. Isolation protocols should be rigorously applied for dogs showing any clinical signs of respiratory disease, including wearing disposable gloves when handling infected dogs or cleaning contaminated cages. There is no way to distinguish canine influenza from respiratory disease caused by other infections based on clinical signs alone.

Advice to dog owners: Dog owners whose dogs are coughing or showing other signs of respiratory disease should not expose their dog to other dogs, and should contact their veterinarian. Early veterinary evaluation is crucial to identifying and stopping potential outbreaks. Canine influenza is a disease of dogs; no human infections with canine influenza have ever been reported. The Public Health Insider (Seattle & King County) put out a blog post this morning that you can share with your clients: http://publichealthinsider.com/2016/01/12/dog-owners-beware-canine-influenza-may-be-on-the-rise-in-king-county/

Background on canine influenza H3N2: Canine influenza virus H3N2 is a type of avian flu virus that adapted to infect dogs and was previously only found in Asia (particularly Korea, China and Thailand). H3N2 was first detected in the US in April 2015 after an outbreak began in Chicago, causing greater than 1,000 cases. As of November 2015, doginfluenza.com shows that canine influenza virus H3N2 infections have been reported in 25 states, not including Washington. Canine influenza virus H3N2 is highly contagious and all dogs, regardless of breed or age, are at risk of infection when first exposed. Good infection control practices are the best way to prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including canine influenza.


For more information regarding canine influenza:

Canine Influenza May be on the Rise in King County

https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Reference/Pages/Canine-Influenza-Backgrounder.aspx

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/DiseaseInfo/disease.php?name=canine-influenza&lang=en

http://www.doginfluenza.com/

KC CIV Reporting Form 1 22 2016

Updates in Canine Influenza Virus: Management, treatment, diagnosis, prevention and vaccination – VETgirl on demand webinar – 2 hours

Canine Influenza Webinar –  Dr. Stephan Carey from Michigan State University

Frequently Asked Questions for Pet Businesses about Canine Influenza Virus – Public Health Seattle & King County

Canine Influenza Tip Sheets

Addressing-CIV Final

Summary of CIRDC testing 2015

H3N2 canine flu may require longer isolation – JAVMA, January 15, 2016

Case of highly contagious dog flu confirmed in Helena – Independent Reports Helena

Local vet says don’t panic about canine flu – King5 News Western Washington

Canine flu may rise in King County – King5 News Western Washington

New strain of dog flu suspected at Kent kennel – Seattle Times

Canine influenza a possibility in King County – Public Insider Seattle & King County

Concerns rise again over dog flu cases in Chicago – WGN TV Chicago

Dog flu reported at South Loop pet store (Chicago) – WGN TV Chicago

Forsyth Humane Society Re-Opens After Confirmed Canine Influenza Case (North Carolina) – Time Warner Cable News

Dog flu detected in Raleigh – WRAL.com

New dog flu spreading through WNC – Black Mountain News

Doggie Day Care Closes Temporarily (Ohio) – Local 12 WKRC Cincinnati

Dog flu now spreading beyond the Chicago area – Chicago Tribune

Dog flu hits Warren County (Cincinnati, Ohio) – Dayton Daily News

Dog Flu Case Reported at Etowah Valley Humane Society (Georgia) – Cartersville Patch

10 Confirmed Canine Influenza Cases: Hospital Administrator (Asheville NC) – ABC 13 News

Canine flu reports reach Raleigh (NC) –  WRAL.com Pet blog

Dog Flu Threat Increases Across America – Steve Dale

Dog owners in S.C. should be on the lookout for canine influenza – Aiken Standard

Dog flu sweeps through metro Atlanta – WSB TV Atlanta

Canine flu rising fast in Metro AtlantaMy Fox Atlanta News

INFLUENZA, CANINE – USA (11): (MINNESOTA) H3N2 – International Society for Infectious Diseases

Canine Influenza Outbreak Management for Shelters – UC Davis

Canine Influenza FAQ: Questions, Answers, and Interim Guidelines – American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine Reference Guide for Veterinarians – American Veterinary Medical Association

Pet Owners’ Guide to Canine Influenza  – American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine influenza National Testing Summary Map – Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine

Exam room and isolation protocol – Chicago Veterinary Emergency & Specialty Center

Reportable Diseases in Washington

Reportable Diseases – WA State Department of Agriculture

Notifiable Diseases – WA State Department of Health